Sunday, August 30, 2009

'Moon rock' in Dutch museum is just petrified wood

The Dutch national museum said Thursday that one of its prized possessions, a rock supposedly brought back from the moon by U.S. astronauts, is just a piece of petrified wood.

Rijksmuseum spokeswoman Xandra van Gelder, who oversaw the investigation that proved the piece was a fake, said the museum will keep it anyway as a curiosity.

"It's a good story, with some questions that are still unanswered," she said. "We can laugh about it."

The museum acquired the rock after the death of former Prime Minister Willem Drees in 1988. Drees received it as a private gift on Oct. 9, 1969 from then-U.S. ambassador J. William Middendorf during a visit by the three Apollo 11 astronauts, part of their "Giant Leap" goodwill tour after the first moon landing.

Middendorf, who lives in Rhode Island, told Dutch broadcaster NOS news that he had gotten it from the U.S. State Department, but couldn't recall the exact details.

"I do remember that (Drees) was very interested in the little piece of stone," the NOS quoted Middendorf as saying. "But that it's not real, I don't know anything about that."
Read more here

Dedroidifying tip for the day


Thanks Relaxed Focus

Stuck in a culture that needs to settle on one way to look at things

"Just because we have been taught to assign UFO phenomena to aliens coming from other planets does not make it so. (Actually, it might, but that's another ontological can of worms.)

We are stuck in a culture that needs to settle on one way to look at things, and uncomfortable with ambiguity, for the most part. Any non-human intelligence who wanted to "conquer" us, or at least make limited contact would do well to exploit this tendency, as well as our reliance on conscious sensory input to make their presence as subtle as a light breeze on our collective consciousness. No flying saucers, death rays, or even handshakes with the President needed." Greg Bishop
Hat tip Posthuman Blues

At The Drive-In - Invalid Litter Dept


At The Drive-In - Invalid Litter Dept

The song's lyrics and music video deal with the Juárez murders, a series of rapes and murders in Cd. Juárez of young women who worked in factories called maquiladoras. Cd. Juárez is located just across the U.S.-Mexican border from El Paso, Texas, ATDI's home town. The song explicitly criticizes the federales, or Mexican police, for their lack of response to these cases.