Saturday, November 15, 2008

Thelemic analysis of Star Wars

Old usenet post. Subject: George Lucas a disciple of Aleister Crowley? From: Cavalorn - Newsgroups: alt.gothic - (source). Thelemic references in the Star Wars trilogy:

Crowley's secret name in the OTO was supposed to have been 'Phoenix' and the symbol of the Rebel Alliance is a stylised phoenix.

Crowley was OHO of the Order of Oriental Templars (OTO) and Lucas' original name for the Jedi Knights was the Jedi Templars.

The windows in the Emperor's chambers at the climax of Return of the Jedi spell 'OTO'. (Does the author mean these?)

From the Book of the Law, dictated to Crowley: 'the obeah and the wanga, the work of the wand and the work of the sword, these he shall learn and teach.' Obeah = Obi. Wanga = Wan. Thus, Obi-Wan. And what device is a wand one moment and a sword the next? A lightsaber, of course; and the relevance of 'learn and teach' is obvious, since Obi-Wan is the teacher.

Vader's sabre is red, the colour of the sphere of Geburah, or Severity: Obi-Wan's is blue, the colour of its opposing sphere, Chesed or Mercy.

Crowley makes references to 'the dwarf insane yet crafty' who is the source of true Wisdom, obviously a reference to Yoda.

The greatest ordeal in Crowley's A.'.A.'. system is the 'crossing of the abyss'. One reaches the brink of a great gulf and must either surrender everything one is and jump, or remain behind to become a 'black brother' or 'brother of the left hand path'. The 'crossing of the abyss' is foreshadowed in A New Hope, at the point at which Luke and Leia swing over the chasm, but is actually achieved in full in Empire Strikes Back, at the climax of the film.

In the climax of Empire, Luke's right hand is severed at the wrist, implying that he must take the left hand path and turn to the Dark Side, i.e. become a 'black brother'. Faced with the choice of crossing the Abyss or turning to the 'Left Hand Path', Luke chooses to jump, which is the act that redeems him from a future of corruption.

Luke is also the Horus figure, the avenger (as in Revenge of the Jedi, the original title). In the climax of Empire, Vader (previously identified with Set, the murderer of the father) is revealed to _be_ the father, the dark Osiris - this being the same secret that was revealed in the Egyptian Mysteries, namely that 'Osiris is a Black God!'

The 'Black Brethren' are those who have 'shut themselves up', become encased and closed off from the Universe, exactly as Vader is encased in black armour. Their sphere on the Tree of Life is the false sphere 'Da'ath', obviously the source for 'Darth'.

Vader out of his armour proves to be a bald guy with an English accent, uncannily reminiscent of Crowley.

Not convinced yet? Try this quote from one of Crowley's Holy Books, in which a part of the Star Wars universe is mentioned BY NAME:
'... Thy messenger was more terrible than the Death-star.'

The messenger of the Emperor is of course Vader, who possesses (and represents) a power far more terrible than the Death Star - the dark side of the Force itself. As Vader himself reminds his fellow Imperials, 'The ability to destroy a planet is insignificant next to the power of the Force.'

You might recognise this scene, too:
'the chamber was corrupt; the air stank... He enveloped me with his demon tentacles; yea, the eight fears took hold upon me.'
Garbage compactors, anyone? However, we all know what happened next:

'I slipped from the embrace as a stone from the sling of a boy of the woodlands. I was smooth and hard as ivory; the horror gat no hold.' Smooth and hard as ivory indeed, for Luke is wearing stormtrooper armour in that scene.

Well, George? Been having a bit of the old Do-what-thou-wilt, have we?

Cav (Source)

ps: this is every bit as serious as Crowley's own qabalistic analysis of nursery rhymes. ;)

2 comments:

The Secret Sun said...

Here's a cool site that may provide some context:

http://www.moongadget.com/origins/index.html

dedroidify said...

Excellent, thanks man!