Thursday, May 8, 2008

IlluminatiMATRIX - What In The World's Going On?


IlluminatiMATRIX - What In The World's Going On?

Maybe first check out this extensive post about Bryan Kemila and IlluminatiMatrix and of course http://illuminatimatrix.wordpress.com itself.

Prepare for strange but fascinating theories on reality, conspiracy, language and symbols. Wether it's truth, confirmation bias or a combination of it, or just wrong, or just another view of reality that we can make possible, or the many other possibilities I still haven't figured out yet. Informed comments are hoped for (after checking out the vid, post & site :p). I e-mailed Bryan Kemila a few times but it didn't make me much wiser about my remaining questions, to be continued!

Dedroidify Vids updated

To give new people the heads up, here is the dedroidify.com/vids page, recently updated it with some new consciousness & conspiracy streaming videos and fixed a lot (150+) of broken links. If you still find broken links (which is certain at the rate youtube & google video remove them...) you can always try a google video search on the title. Reporting broken links is very much appreciated, you can do it here in the comments or in the guestbook. Suggestions are welcome too.

Here is my recommended vids post which can also be found in the sidebar link section.

Little Brother

"No, no, Marcus is more aspirational than autobiographical," laughs Cory Doctorow about the 17-year-old hero of his newest science fiction novel, Little Brother (Fenn). Principled, literate, brave and, above all, technologically savvy, Marcus puts pebbles in his shoes to fool his school's "gait recognition" software, chats with friends on an IMParanoid messaging program, and takes on the Department of Homeland Security's Orwellian surveillance system in the name of liberty. "He's the teen we all would have liked to have been," says Doctorow, 36, who nevertheless bristles at the thought that Marcus is too unrealistic: "People have said, 'C'mon, no teenager reads Jane Jacobs'; I read Jane Jacobs when I was a teenager!"

Check out the entire article here
And this page about the book

CIA book: Psychology of Intelligence Analysis

From the preface: This volume pulls together and republishes, with some editing, updating, and additions, articles written during 1978-86 for internal use within the CIA Directorate of Intelligence. Four of the articles also appeared in the Intelligence Community journal Studies in Intelligence during that time frame. The information is relatively timeless and still relevant to the never-ending quest for better analysis.

Psychology of Intelligence Analysis by Richards J. Heuer, Jr.

From the chapter titles I think this may be interesting.

Via Disinfo.com

Can You Become a Creature of New Habits?

This article embodies the dedroidifying spirit! :)

Rather than dismissing ourselves as unchangeable creatures of habit, we can instead direct our own change by consciously developing new habits. In fact, the more new things we try — the more we step outside our comfort zone — the more inherently creative we become, both in the workplace and in our personal lives.

But don’t bother trying to kill off old habits; once those ruts of procedure are worn into the hippocampus, they’re there to stay. Instead, the new habits we deliberately ingrain into ourselves create parallel pathways that can bypass those old roads.

“The first thing needed for innovation is a fascination with wonder,” says Dawna Markova, author of “The Open Mind” and an executive change consultant for Professional Thinking Partners. “But we are taught instead to ‘decide,’ just as our president calls himself ‘the Decider.’ ” She adds, however, that “to decide is to kill off all possibilities but one. A good innovational thinker is always exploring the many other possibilities.”

“You cannot have innovation,” she adds, “unless you are willing and able to move through the unknown and go from curiosity to wonder.”

Read the entire NY Times article by Janet Rae-Dupree here

Via TechnOccult

Love, Grief & a Rabbit. Flow my tears, the policeman said. (3/4)

Jason said, "There are different kinds of love."
"Like Emily fusselman's rabbit." She glanced up at him. "A woman I knew, married, with three kids; she had two kittens and then she got one of those big gray Belgian rabbits that go lipperty lipperty lipperty on those huge hind legs. For the first month the rabbit was afraid to come out of his cage. It was a he, we think, as best we could tell. Then after a month he would come out of his cage and hop around the living room. After two months he learned to climb the stairs and scratch on Emily's bedroom door to wake her up in the morning. He started playing with the cats, and there the trouble began because he wasn't as smart as a cat."

"Rabbits have smaller brains," Jason said.
Ruth Rae said, "Hard by. Anyhow, he adored the cats and tried to do everything they did. He even learned to use the catbox most of the time. Using tufts of hair he pulled from his chest, he made a nest behind the couch and wanted the kittens to get into it. But they never would. The end of it all - nearly - came when he tried to play Gotcha with a German shepherd that some lady brought over. You see, the rabbit learned to play this game with the cats and with Emily Fusselman and the children where he'd hide behind the couch and then come running out, running very fast in circles, and everyone tried to catch him, but they usually couldn't and then he'd run back to safety behind the couch, where no one was supposed to follow. But the dog didn't know the rules of the game and when the rabbit ran back behind the couch the dog went after him and snapped its jaws around the rabbit's rear end. Emily managed to pry the dog's jaws open and she got the dog outside, but the rabbit was badly hurt. He recovered, but after that he was terrified of dogs and ran away if he saw one even through the window. And the part of him the dog bit, he kept that part hidden behind the draps because he had no hair there and was ashamed. But what was so touching about him was his pushing against the limits of his - what would you say? - physiology? His limitations as a rabbit, trying to become a more evolved life form, like the cats. Wanting all the time to be with them and play with them as an equal. That's all there is to it, really. The kittens wouldn't stay in the nest he built for them, and the dog didn't know the rules and got him. He lived several years. But who would have thought that a rabbit coul ddevelop such a complex personality? And when you were sitting on the couch and he wanted you to get off, so he could lie down, he'd nudge you and then if you didn't move he'd bite you. But look at the aspirations of that rabbit and look at his failing. A little life trying. And all the time it was hopeless. But the rabbit didn't know that. Or maybe he did know and kept trying anyhow. But I thihk he didn't understand. He just wanted to do it so badly. It was his whole life, because he loved the cats."

"I thought you didn't like animals," Jason said.
"Not any more. Not after so many defeats and wipe-outs. Like the rabbit; he eventually, of course, died. Emily Fusselman cried for days. A week. I could see what it had done to her and I didn't want to get involved."
"But stopping loving animals entirely so that you -"
"Their lives are so short. Just so fucking goddamn short. Okay some people lose a creature they love and then go on and transfer that love to another one. But it hurts; it hurts."
"Then why is love so good?" He had brooded about that, in and out of his own relationships, all his long adult life. He broooded about it acutely now. Through what had recently happened to him, up to Emily Fusselman's rabbit. This moment of painfulness. "You love someone and they leave. They come home one day and start packing their things and you say, "What's happening?" and they say, "I got a better offer someplace else," and there they go, out of your life forever, and after that until you're dead you're carrying around this huge hunk of love with no one to give it to. And if you do find someone to give it to, the same thing happens all over. Or you call them up on the phone one day and say, "This is Jason," and they say, "Who?" and then you know you've had it. They don't know who the hell you are. So I guess they never did know; you never had them in the first place."
Ruth said, "Love isn't just wanting another person the way you want to own an object you see in a store. That's just desire. You want to have it around, take it home and set it up somewhere in the apartment like a lamp. Love is" - she paused, reflecting - "like a father saving his children from a burning house, getting them out and dying himself. When you love you cease to live for yourself; you live for another person."
"And that's good?" It did not sound so good to him.
"It overcomes instinct. Instincts push us into fighting for survival. Like the pols ringing all the campuses. Survival of ourselves at the expense of others; each of us claws his way up. I cazn give you a good example. My twenty-first husband, Frank. We were married six months. During that time he stopped loving me and became horribly unhappy. I still loved him; I wanted to remain with him, but it was hurting him. So I let him go. You see? It was better for him, and because I loved him that's what counted. See?"
Jason said, "But why is it good to go against the instinct for self-survival?"
"You don't think I can say."
"No," he said.
"Because the instinct for survival loses in the end. With every living creature, mole, bat, human, frog. Even frogs who play cigars and play chess. You can never accomplish what your survival instinct sets out to do, so ultimately your striving endsin failure and you succumb to death, and that ends it. But if you can love you can fade out and watch -"
"I'm not ready to fade out," Jason said.
"- you can fade out and watch with happiness, and with cool, mellow, alpha, contentment, the highest form of contentment, the living on of one of those you love."

"But they die, too."
"True." Ruth Rae chewed on her lip.
"It's better not to love so that never happens to you. Even a pet, a dog or a cat. As you pointed out - love them and they perish. If the death of a rabbit is bad -" He had, then, a glimpse of horror: the crushed bones and hair of a girl, held and leaking blood, in the jaws of a dimly-seen enemy outlooming any dog.
"But you can grieve," Rush said, anxiously studying his face. "Jason! Grief is the most powerful emotion a man or child or animal can feel. It's a good feeling."
"In what fucking way?" He said harshly.
"Grief causes you to leave yourself. You step outside your narrow little pelt. And you can't feel grief unless you've had love before it - grief is the final outcome of love, because it's love lost. You do understand; I know you do. But you just don't want to think about it. It's the cycle of love completed: to love, to lose, to feel grief, to leave, and then to love again. Jason, grief is awareness that you will have to be alone, and there is nothing beyond that because being alone is the ultimate final destiny of each individual living creature. That's what death is, the great loneliness...

Grief reunites you with what you've lost. Its a merging; you go with the loved thing or person that's going away. In some fashion you split with yourself and accompany it, to go part of the way with it on its journey. You follow it as far as you can go..."


How good really are the police? he asked himself. They managed to get my name wrong; they pulled the wrong file on me. Isn't it possible they'll fuck up all down the line? Maybe. But maybe not.
He had mutually opposing conceptions of the police, too. And could not resolve those either. And so, like a rabbit, like Emily fusselman's rabbit, froze where he was. Hoping as he did so that everyone understood the rules: you do not destroy a creature that does not know what to do.

Also check out this earlier post on the book

I’ve found God, says man who cracked the genome

Check out this Timesonline article about Francis Collins.

Finders keepers!

Daily Dedroidify: Illusion


Daily Dedroidify: Illusion

Click pic or link for slideshow of optical illusions, don't click through or you'll spoil tomorrow's daily dedroidify :p

You'll never see this on TV: Revolt at European Parliament


You'll never see this on TV: Revolt at European Parliament

This is how easy it is to take over the world.
All you need is many easily seduced cowards coming together.